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Response to Charleston Animal Society Attack Advertisement

A small business can’t compete with the Charleston Animal Society by running full-page ads in the Post & Courier. Using that photograph of Blondie to portray carriage tours is akin to using a plane crash to portray air travel. Below is a photograph of Blondie taken last week at Shuga Cain plantation. He is fit, healthy and fully recovered from his fall. After an extensive study conducted by an independent veterinarian hired by the city, it was determined that the Blondie incident was nothing more than an accident; a fall not related to heat, weight of the carriage, or the care and treatment of the animal. Blondie is fine. By addressing each of the accusations put forth I hope to give you a clear picture of the reality of the situation as well as the duplicity of the CAS. Despite denials,…

Re: Online Petition

An online petition advocating banning carriage tours in Charleston has been circulated to both local politicians and businesses. Particularly disturbing is the prominent display of names of local businesses as “petitioning businesses” as if they are supporting this initiative when they are not.[1] This type of misrepresentation resonates throughout the entire petition. Underlying it all is a general tone of nastiness as both my honesty and humanity are questioned as well as the competence of the city and the veterinarians. Contemplating the best response, I have broken the petition down section by section to address each inaccuracy.  My purpose is to educate by presenting a factual,, verifiable case supporting the use of my animals. EXTREME HEAT: Charleston has a subtropical climate with warm humid weather much of the year.   Carriage operators operate their horse wagons at 98 degrees, with no…

As a Father — A Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor, As a father, my heart goes out to the parents of the toddlers injured by the dog this past Saturday. As a carriage operator, I’m intrigued by this city of two tails. As quick as the Charleston Animal Society has been to vilify the carriage community after the “Blondie incident”, they offer the very same explanations in their defense that they dismissed when we presented them. Blondie presented no indications of distress before she fell just as Cruz had not shown any bad behavior. This apparently is sufficient explanation for the animal society, yet is woefully inadequate for Blondie’s owner. The experts who will re-examine Cruz will be chosen, or even employed, by the animal society while the veterinarian reporting on Blondie had to be independent, chosen by the city.  That was a demand by the animal society;…

A Letter to the Mayoral Candidates

Recently the Charleston Animal Society has been making the rounds of mayoral candidates talking about carriage tours.  Since they have publicly stated that carriage horses should not be used in Charleston, I can only guess at the content of their presentation. That’s why I’m writing this letter. I want to be sure that you know there is another story to be told, a story about the safe, humane use of horses and mules in Charleston for many years, the care they receive, the lives they live, their retirement placement, and most importantly a system that documents it.  The Charleston Animal Society has its opinion; the carriage community and the city of Charleston have the facts. Our argument is a factual record built on tracking the life path of our animals down to the hour, vetting them three times a year,…

Palmetto Carriage Strengthens Management Team

Palmetto Carriage Works Names Chief Administrative Officer Charleston, S.C. – Palmetto Carriage Works, the oldest carriage company in historic Charleston, S.C., to offer guided horse and mule-drawn tours of the city, has named Victoria H. Moore chief administrative officer. In this role, Moore manages the company’s accounts and finances and is responsible for reviewing operational…

Carriage Tour Oversight Works by Tom Doyle

If a tree falls in the forest, does it make a sound? I don’t know about that, but when a horse falls in the city, the sound is deafening. Almost lost in the entire conversation is the result: The horse got back on its feet, walked into a trailer, was treated and examined by one of the top equine veterinarians in the state and was pronounced fit and healthy. Why then is the outcry so disproportionate to the actual incident? Most people deplore any form of animal abuse and the implication that this was a case of abuse was enough to ignite the fuse. I was present at the protest July 21, and one protester carried a sign that read, “8 incidents in 6 years; when does it become too much?” I went over city records, did some math and…